36 Articles tagged “Extensions”

Back from the FODESM 2014 Conference, here’s the slides I’ve been using for the Advanced Extension Use Cases talk I gave, based on the ongoing work to be found under the Tour of Extensions index in this web site.

If you’re interested into the talk contents, then you might be interested into the following list of articles where I actually did all the work leading to the slides in the above PDF:

Last week I had the pleasure to present two talks at the awesome PostgreSQL Conference Europe. The first one was actually a tutorial about Writing & using Postgres Extensions where we spent 3 hours on what are PostgreSQL Extensions, what you can expect from them, and how to develop a new one. Then I also had the opportunity to present the new version of pgloader in a talk about Migrating from MySQL to PostgreSQL.

Denormalizing Tags

In our Tour of Extensions today’s article is about advanced tag indexing. We have a great data collection to play with and our goal today is to be able to quickly find data matching a complex set of tags. So, let’s find out those lastfm tracks that are tagged as blues and rhythm and blues, for instance. In this article, we’re going to play with music related tags

PostgreSQL is an all round impressive Relational DataBase Management System which implements the SQL standard (see the very useful reference page Comparison of different SQL implementations for details). PostgreSQL also provides with unique solutions in the database market and has been leading innovation for some years now. Still, there’s no support for Autonomous Transactions within the server itself. Let’s have a look at how to easily implement them with PL/Proxy.


In our previous article about Loading Geolocation Data, we did load some data into PostgreSQL and saw the quite noticable impact of a user transformation. As it happens, the function that did the integer to IP representation was so naive as to scratch the micro optimisation itch of some Common Lisp hackers: thanks a lot guys, in particular stassats who came up with the solution we’re seeing now. The previous code was a straight rewrite of the provided documentation in Common Lisp.

As I’ve been mentionning in the past already, I’m currently rewriting pgloader from scratch in Common Lisp. In terms of technical debt that’s akin to declaring bankrupcy, which is both sad news and good news as there’s suddenly new hope of doing it right this time. Let’s dive into the python to common lisp rewrite Why rewriting pgloader? Several problems hinted me into doing something other than maintaining the code I had for pgloader.

In a previous article about Trigger Parameters we have been using the extension hstore in order to compute some extra field in our records, where the fields used both for the computation and for storing the results were passed in as dynamic parameters. Today we’re going to see another trigger use case for hstore: we are going to record changes made to our tuples.

Sometimes you want to compute values automatically at INSERT time, like for example a duration column out of a start and an end column, both timestamptz. It’s easy enough to do with a BEFORE TRIGGER on your table. What’s more complex is to come up with a parametrized spelling of the trigger, where you can attach the same stored procedure to any table even when the column names are different from one another.

Dimitri Fontaine

PostgreSQL Major Contributor

Open Source Software Engineer

France