El-Get 4.1 is out

August, 28 2012

Please welcome the new stable version of El-Get, the much awaited version 4.1 has now been branched for your pleasure. It's packed with lots of features to make your life easy, comes with a Info documentation book and even has a logo. That's no joke, I found one, at least:

 

el-get-3.1

September, 16 2011

The el-get project releases its new stable version, 3.1. This new release fixes bugs, add a host of new recipes (we have 420 of them and counting) and some nice new features too. You really want to upgrade.

 

We still have this problem to solve with extensions and their packaging. How to best organize things so that your extension is compatible with before 9.1 and 9.1 and following releases of PostgreSQL?

 

el-get 2.2

May, 26 2011

We've spotted a little too late for our own taste a discrepancy in the source tree: a work in progress patch landed in git just before to release el-get stable. So we cleaned the tree (thanks again Julien), branched a stable maintenance tree, and released 2.2 from there.

 

el-get 2.1

May, 26 2011

Current el-get status is stable, ready for daily use and packed with extra features that make life easier. There are some more things we could do, as always, but they will be about smoothing things further.

 

While currently too busy at work to deliver much Open Source contributions, let's debunk an old habit of PostgreSQL extension authors. It's all down to copy pasting from contrib, and there's no reason to continue doing $libdir this way ever since 7.4 days.

 

I've been working on skytools3 packaging lately. I've been pushing quite a lot of work into it, in order to have exactly what I needed out of the box, after some 3 years of production and experiences with the products. Plural, yes, because even if pgbouncer and plproxy are siblings to the projets (same developers team, separate life cycle and releases), then skytools still includes several sub-projects.

 

Extensions in 9.1

March, 01 2011

If you've not been following closely you might have missed out on extensions integration. Well, Tom spent some time on the patches I've been preparing for the last 4 months. And not only did he commit most of the work but he also enhanced some parts of the code (better factoring) and basically finished it.

 

Yes, you read it well, el-get currently features 174 recipes, and is now reaching the 1.1 release. The reason for this release is mainly that I have two big chunks of code to review and the current code has been very stable for awhile. It seems better to do a release with the stable code that exists now before to shake it this much. If you're wondering when to jump in the water and switch to using el-get, now is a pretty good time.

 

Introducing Extensions

October, 21 2010

After reading Simon's blog post, I can't help but try to give some details about what it is exactly that I'm working on. As he said, there are several aspects to extensions in PostgreSQL, it all begins here: Chapter 35. Extending SQL.

 

el-get reaches 1.0

October, 07 2010

It's been a week since the last commits in the el-get repository, and those were all about fixing and adding recipes, and about notifications. Nothing like core plumbing you see. Also, 0.9 was released on 2010-08-24 and felt pretty complete already, then received lots of improvements. It's high time to cross the line and call it 1.0!

 

switch-window reaches 0.8

September, 13 2010

I wanted to play with the idea of using the whole keyboard for my switch-window utility, but wondered how to get those keys in the right order and all. Finally found quail-keyboard-layout which seems to exists for such uses, as you can see:

 

Synchronous Replication

September, 06 2010

Although the new asynchronous replication facility that ships with 9.0 ain't released to the wide public yet, our hackers hero are already working on the synchronous version of it. A part of the facility is rather easy to design, we want something comparable to DRBD flexibility, but specific to our database world. So synchronous would either mean recv, fsync or apply, depending on what you need the standby to have already done when the master acknowledges the COMMIT. Let's call that the service level.

 

Thanks to you readers of Planet Emacsen taking the time to try those pieces of emacs lisp found in my blog, and also the time to comment on them, some bugs have been fixed, and new releases appeared.

 

In trying to help an extension debian packaging effort, I've once again proposed to handle it. That's because I now begin to know how to do it, as you can see in my package overview page at debian QA facility. There's a reason why I proposed myself here, it's that yet another tool of mine is now to be found in debian, and should greatly help extension packaging there. You can already check for the postgresql-server-dev-all package page if you're that impatient!

 

Some user on IRC was reading the releases notes in order to plan for a minor upgrade of his 8.3.3 installation, and was puzzled about potential needs for rebuilding GIST indexes. That's from the 8.3.5 release notes, and from the 8.3.8 notes you see that you need to consider hash indexes on interval columns too. Now the question is, how to find out if any such beasts are in use in your database?

 

There's a big trend nowadays about using column storage as opposed to what PostgreSQL is doing, which would be row storage. The difference is that if you have the same column value in a lot of rows, you could get to a point where you have this value only once in the underlying storage file. That means high compression. Then you tweak the executor to be able to load this value only once, not once per row, and you win another huge source of data traffic (often enough, from disk).

 

So, following previous blog entries about importing fixed width data, from Postgres Online Journal and David (perl) Fetter, I couldn't resist following the meme and showing how to achieve the same thing with pgloader.

 

Yes. This pgloader project is still maintained and somewhat active. Development happens when I receive a complaint, either about a bug in existing code or a feature in yet-to-write code. If you have a bug to report, just send me an email!

 

So there it is, this newer contribution of mine that I presented at PGDay is now in debian NEW queue. pg_staging will empower you with respect to what you do about those nightly backups ( pg_dump -Fc or something).

 

prefix 1.0.0

October, 06 2009

So there it is, at long last, the final 1.0.0 release of prefix! It's on its way into the debian repository (targetting sid, in testing in 10 days) and available on pgfoundry to.

 

It seems like debian developers are back from annual conference and holiday, so they have had a look at the NEW queue and processed the packages in there. Two of them were mines and waiting to get in unstable, hstore-new and preprepare.

 

At long last, here it is. With binary versions both for postgresal-8.3 and postgresal-8.4! Unfortunately my other packaging efforts are still waiting on the NEW queue, but I hope to soon see hstore-new and preprepare enter debian too.

 

At long last, after millions and millions of queries just here at work and some more in other places, the prefix project is reaching 1.0 milestone. The release candidate is getting uploaded into debian at the moment of this writing, and available at the following place: prefix-1.0~rc1.tar.gz.

 

On the performance mailing list, a recent thread drew my attention. It devired to be about using a connection pool software and prepared statements in order to increase scalability of PostgreSQL when confronted to a lot of concurrent clients all doing simple select queries. The advantage of the pooler is to reduce the number of backends needed to serve the queries, thus reducing PostgreSQL internal bookkeeping. Of course, my choice of software here is clear: PgBouncer is an excellent top grade solution, performs real well (it won't parse queries), reliable, flexible.

 

It's time for Skytools news again! First, we did improve documentation of current stable branch with hosting high level presentations and tutorials on the PostgreSQL wiki. Do check out the Londiste Tutorial, it seems that's what people hesitating to try out londiste were missing the most.

 

emacs-snapshot

December, 08 2008

If you want to live on the bleeding edge, it's easy enough to get a non existing release of GNU Emacs under debian sid, thanks to http://emacs.orebokech.com/.